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Willows - a Weed Of National Significance (Wons)
 
Willows are part of the Salix genus. There are two major subgroups in this genus that are naturalised in Australia.
 
Tree Willows (salix subgenus) and Shrub Willows (ventrix subgenus).
About 100 of 300 worldwide willow taxa have been introduced to Australia.
Some important species locally are
 
Tree subgenus: (Salix Salix)
Black willow, Crack willow, Golden Willow and weeping Willow
 
Shrub subgenus (Salix ventrix)
Pussy Willows

Identification of Willows

Click to read the guide online

This guide can be viewed on the Weeds of National Significance website. Click on the image to go to the website.

Summary of State and Territory Recommendations for on-ground Willow Management
(2008 via WoNS website  http://www.weeds.org.au/WoNS/willows/docs/Summary_of_State_and_Territory_Mgt_Recommendations.pdf)
New South Wales
Very High Priority – New South Wales
Prevent establishment
It is of national importance to ensure S. exigua, S. daphnoides and S. triandra do not establish in this state:
These taxa should be monitored for and eradicated if found as a very high priority. Some of these taxa are relatively unknown therefore it is a recommendation that information be developed to help land managers identify these willows.
High Priority – New South Wales
Eradication
The following willow taxa should be targeted for eradication in New South Wales:
S. cinerea in Hunter-Central Rivers, Northern Rivers and Southern Rivers CMAs;
S. babylonica in Lower Murray Darling CMA; and
S. nigra in Murray CMA.
 
Other willows that pose a high risk and may be eradicable from the state include:
S. viminalis, which is only recorded in Southern Rivers and Murrumbidgee CMAs;
S. purpurea, in Southern Rivers, Murrumbidgee and Murray CMAs; and State and Territory Recommendations
Several taxa that may be under-recorded in the mapping database, but appear to be eradicable, including S. x sepulcralis, S. alba, and S. x pendulina.
 
Protect assets
Manage S. fragilis and S. x rubens to prevent spread and protect high value assets.
Manage gender to prevent their spread by seed (eg: remove female willows within a 1km radius of S. fragilis and male S. x rubens)
Coordinate efforts with other regions and states (Australian Capital Territory and Victoria) to minimise impacts from willows that cannot be eradicated.
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Click to go to the WoNS website

Warning: This is a large document - 11,042 kb. If you would like to view it in smaller pieces go to: http://www.weeds.org.au/WoNS/willows/

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